k

Kei

kei
Joined May 2022

Originally from Japan. Based in San Francisco.

Building a social web highlighter that allows people to highlight and collect web articles, organize them, and follow like-minded people to learn together. We’d like to make it a place where people can leave their learning as a digital legacy for future generations.

I write about “learn in public”, “curator economy”, and “philosophy”.

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Kei

The division of roles in knowledge management tools

As we build products that manage knowledge and content, we come across many questions. One of the most interesting questions is why do people keep the content they discover and what they learn? I think content that you happened to find a few years ago is not likely to be valuable today, and it is not likely to be useful unless you have done a lot of research in the field and found it or learned about it. Nevertheless, I think the behavior of people trying to leave content behind is interesting, and the following are some possible reasons why.

  • By looking back at information, we can remember it.

  • We can see the context and relevance and learn from it by organizing certain content and information.

  • When we come across good content, we want to keep it and be able to refer back to it at any time.

  • We want to be able to refer to and analyze our current thoughts and feelings in the future.

  • We fear that it will be wasted as we’re investing time and effort.

The third is in the context of curation, where quality content is of value in a world of so much information. It is an intrinsic human need to select and preserve quality content. Robin Good, an expert in curation media technology, states in his article, “Why To Curate Information

“Content curation is a natural solution to a natural phenomenon: resource abundance. […] It is a natural, spontaneous phenomenon.”

The fourth was a concept that I was taught while interviewing someone, and she stated the following in her blog.

“During my studies, I’d learned a few interesting things, that I’ve never ever really talked to someone about, and never tried to write them down — and now I wish I had those insights written down, so that I could analyze them a bit more — perhaps I could find more sense in my present that I can’t seem to find.”

And in response, she recommends the following:

“I highly recommend to scribble down any spontaneous idea or thought — in an app editor, google docs file (you find your own suitable way) — but please do, you would never know how this idea could help you in the future, or even might help to spark an even better idea.”

I think the point of writing it down is very important, and in this regard, I think there is a fundamental need for confirmation of personal identity. A person’s identity is something that can be surprisingly confusing, and people confirm their identity either in their relationships with others or in an explicit history that is consistent with their past self. I think that logs that exist over time, and data that relate the past self to the present self, are very important in terms of knowing and reaffirming oneself.

The fifth is psychological safety. I believe that psychological safety is one of the most important reasons for preserving knowledge and content.

Matthew Guay, creator of a writing tool called reproof, states in his article “Notes apps are where ideas go to die. And that’s good.

The problem is we ascribe value to our thoughts and findings. They took time to think up and find; they’ve got to be worth something. We’re scared to lose them. As Daniel Kahneman explains the concept of “Loss aversion” in Thinking, Fast and Slow, “The response to losses is stronger than the response to gains.”

Thus, people have a strong emotional motivation to avoid losses. I believe that this motivation, along with practical utility, is what drives the development of knowledge management tools.

So, should we be able to store any good information or knowledge we encounter? Should we create an all-in-one place for this purpose?

I don’t think so. It requires thinking about the flow of how people discover, consumes, and store content, and the jobs they do at each stage.

Generally speaking, people follow the following flow from the time they collect information to the time they store it.

  1. Content Discovery

  2. The temporary storage of content that looks good or important

  3. Permanent storage of really good content or essence/knowledge

In between the second and third are the actions of actual consumption, such as reading the actual content or organizing important points.

And the corresponding services, platforms, and means may include:

  • Content discovery: Search engine, newsletter, YouTube, Podcast, Pinterest, Twitter, Linkedin, etc

  • Temporary place: Pocket, Instapaper, Send to Kindle, Feedly, built-in browser bookmark, etc

  • Permanent place: Roam Research, Obsidian, Notion, Evernote, etc.

And the jobs at each stage are considered as follows

  • Content discovery: Discover good content and information of interest.

  • Temporary place: Temporary storage of interesting content. Forget what you need to remember (recover working memory). Close a large number of open tabs to streamline your work. Filter content that you want to read, or delete if you don’t want to read it.

*Another effect is to make people read longer content.

  • Permanent place: High-quality content, essence, and knowledge are stored stably and can be referred to at any time. Extract or organize and store even better content and information from the content and information in a Temporary place.

The assumption of using separate products for Temporary and Permanent places makes sense given the use cases and jobs for each, but more detailed reasons are given below.

  • Once you have gone through your filter, the content list (Temporary place) has accumulated more useful things for you than the Discovery place. However, there is still a lot of noise in the actual content because not all of the content has been filtered through.

  • Permanent places must be able to aggregate and quickly find really good high-quality information; too much noise does not do that efficiently.

  • People expect one job for one product/function. A job is tied to the feelings and mindset of the person using the product, and it makes more sense to switch products when doing a different job.

Of course, for some people, Temporary Place, and Permanent Place may match and can be managed properly, but this is likely due to a high level of filtering when temporarily storing content or the ability to declutter stored content.

It is also not completely impossible to have both Temporary and Permanent places within the same knowledge management tool by switching accounts or changing the UI.

Given the jobs and roles of Temporary and Permanent places, it makes sense to take each of the following basic product strategies.

Temporary place:

  • Increase the types of media that can be handled.
    Web articles, images, PDFs, videos, audio, book, etc.

  • Increase the number of media storage sources that can be supported.
    Twitter, Pinterest, upload from a device, YouTube, Bookmark import, Kindle, Medium, Linkedin, etc.

  • To save temporarily and easily, make it available seamlessly from anywhere. What you save on your mobile can be read on your desktop/tablet.

  • To be able to quickly find temporarily saved items. Make it visible in list and chronological order.

  • Since it serves as a middle ground, it should be able to import and export content.

  • Do not seek to serve as a Permanent place, but work with the Permanent place to facilitate archiving and deleting of consumed content in the Temporary place (to avoid increasing noise and becoming a link graveyard). Or make it less of a concern.

Permanent place:

  • Ensure high stability and reliability. Store content in local files and the cloud.

  • Ensure easy and efficient search and reference.

  • Only really good content and knowledge should be stored. In other words, avoid noise as much as possible.

  • Provide a mechanism to delete and organize content regularly.

Further value-added strategies include

  • Visualize (Graph view, tag counter)

  • Backlinking (Word units, Roam, etc.)

  • Make pages or parts of content publicly accessible (Notion, Obsidian)

When you think about it this way, you realize that there are separate jobs for each layer of knowledge management, and the tools used have different roles. Knowledge management systems that advocate an all-in-one place appear year after year, but, understandably, they do not last long.

I also include deletion, organizing, and archiving strategies in both Temporary and Permanent places. This is because, in both, excessive accumulation of content and knowledge can ultimately cause users to leave. The utility gained from the accumulation of content, information, and knowledge is outweighed by the effort of organizing them and the inconvenience of not being able to refer to what you need when you need it.

As more noise is added to knowledge management tools, the effort to manage them and the inconvenience of difficulty in retrieving them outweigh the utility gained from storing knowledge.

During our user interviews, we received a variety of feedback: “I have 4,000 pages in Evernote that I can’t manage anymore, but I don’t want to delete them,” “I have tens of thousands of links in Pocket that I don’t use anymore because I don’t know what’s important.” I believe that content and information are destined to be eventually replaced by other tools unless there is a mechanism to regularly declutter it (the latest tools have better search capabilities, the ability to enter metadata, refactoring of tags, etc., and the way management methods are evolving, so I’ll see what happens in this area).

Obsidian vs. Roam vs. LogSeq: Which PKM App is Right For You?

If it gets to this point, eventually all the nodes are linked to other nodes, and I can’t tell what is important anymore.

There is a striking sentence in Matthew Guay’s “Notes apps referenced above are where ideas go to die. And that’s good.

Flipping through your old notes suddenly “feels like sifting through stale garbage,” as Dan Shipper found, disillusioned after building a galaxy of notes in Roam Research. It turns out most of our ideas and discoveries aren’t actually worth that much, not on their own anyhow.

To prevent this from happening, those who use or develop knowledge management tools need to recognize that ideas and their discovery are not worth much and consider mechanisms to reduce the amount of content and information that accumulates. Otherwise, the following will occur.

“So we try again. This next app will be the one true way. We had the philosophy all wrong before. Arrows, perhaps, are better than checklists. Folders and hierarchies versus wikis and backlinks. The sages saw technological enlightenment at the end of the revolution; we simply haven’t attained perfection yet.[…] Then we dump our newest thoughts into it, try the latest features to organize notes, until we’re back to safely forgetting things. Then the illusion gets shattered again, and we’re on to the next new thing.”

In this regard, I now think Readwise has the potential to do well; Readwise falls into the Temporary place in the three categories I mentioned above. I think some people come back to it to save tagging or check the Daily Highlight, but I think the core value of Readwise is its ability to be an aggregator of content and its ability to export that content.

Readwise supports integration with various services, so it would be able to take on the responsibility of storing contents and serve as a permanent place. But learning from the failure patterns of various knowledge management tools in the past, I think Readwise has not dared to create a function to manage the contents on Readwise.

Even when some knowledge management system saturates and users start using the next new service, Readwise will continue to be used if it can support and export the integration with the new service, because Readwise has already accumulated content! Readwise is a service that is already in use. Paradoxically, if too much content and information are stored in a knowledge management tool, it may not work in the end.

I hope this article can give you some insight into the use and development of your knowledge management tool. I’m still in the process of organizing my thoughts, so it is possible that my ideas will change, but I have come to the above conclusions based on my experience in creating knowledge management tools and seeing various failures.

I would like to write another article on tipping points, support for automatic export of content, conversion of information to knowledge, and methodology for organizing information. If you have any questions, please comment on this article or DM me on Twitter or Linkedin. And if you want to see my reading collection of knowledge management, please check out here.

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Kei

Tutorial: How to Export Web Highlights into Readwise

People Who Would Benefit

  • Want to export selected sentences on the web articles into Readwise at once.

  • Use Readwise and want to cite sentences from web articles.

Why Glasp?

1. We don’t disturb your reading experience 💡

  • What you need is just highlighting sentences you like, which end within two seconds.

  • You don’t need to copy & paste sentences one by one while reading.

2. Export sentences you want at once 🙌

  • You don’t need to export the whole article and edit it later. You can export only the sentences you want.

  • And you can search collect a good collection of web articles and search them easily.

3. You can find like-minded people 📚

  • We have more than 7,000+ people who are avid readers, critical thinkers, note-takers, and lifelong learners in our community! So, you can find people with who you will learn together.

Things Needed

How to Install Glasp’s Browser Extension and Select Sentences You Want

1. Prepare a desktop and browser (Chrome, Brave, Edge, or Safari)

  • Glasp works only on Chrome, Brave, Edge, or Safari on the desktop. Firefox is upcoming soon!

  • Open the Glasp page from the link below.

👉 Glasp — Web Page

2. Sign up for Glasp

  • Click Sign Up (beta), and create an account with Google. After you create an account, you’re taken to the Chrome Web Store.

3. Install the browser extension

  • Install Chrome, Edge, Brave, or Safari extension.

4. Go to the Home page

  • Once you installed the extension, you see the Welcome page with the side being opened.

  • Click the Glasp icon on the sidebar. It takes you to the Home page.

  • On the Home page, you’re asked to choose your favorite topic, so please do it.

5. Open an article you like, select and highlight sentences you want to export

  • Open an article and click the icon on the toolbar to open Glasp’s sidebar.

  • Select any sentences you want in the article. You see a popup showing up, then select any color you want (a red arrow at the left). You will see that the selected sentence is highlighted and added to the sidebar on the left.

  • After highlighting sentences, go to the Home page by clicking an icon at the top right on the sidebar (a red arrow at the right).

  • If you couldn’t highlight the sentence, please refresh the page and try it again 🙏

How to Export Sentences into Readwise

1. Go to your profile page by clicking “My Highlights” at the top left

2. Click the Share button and “Export to Readwise”

  • You can cursor any article you like, so choose the article you want to export.

3. Input the Readwise’s Access Token

  • If you click Readwise on the popup, it takes you to the Access Token page on Readwise.

  • After you input the access token, click Save.

4. Click the Share button and “Export to Readwise” again

  • As you did in Step 2, click the Share button and Export to Readwise.

  • If it succeeds, it turns into Exported! View on Readwise.

5. Click “View on Readwise" to see the exported sentence

  • By clicking View on Readwise, it opens a page on Readwise.

6. Check exported content on Readwise

  • See? It’s easy-peasy, right?

Tips

  • You can export highlights into Readwise through mobile devices, too!

Before you leave

Any Questions?

  • Please look at FAQ or message us through Twitter.

👉 FAQs

👉 Twitter

Thank you for reading! Hope this article helps you understand how to export web article’s highlighted sentences into Readwise with Glasp 😉

👉 Glasp

See you next time,

Kei

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Kei

10 Best Safari Extensions You Should Install in 2022

Glasp.co

*This post was originally posted on DigitalGpoint.

Browser extensions may be quite useful for completing tiresome activities and better organizing yourself. Safari extensions, which are a type of add-on, are now included with relevant Mac programs and are also available via the App Store. There’s a Safari plugin for everyone, whether you’re searching for efficiency tips, quick methods to save money on your purchases, or ways to make your browsing experience more enjoyable.

01. Glasp

Glasp

A social web highlighter that allows you to highlight and collect web articles/sentences, organize them and find/follow like-minded people to learn together. As it saves articles that you think are important or resonated with, it’s easy to look back at important things and builds your shared online library. Also, it has a social aspect that you can find other people who have a common interest to learn together.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing: Free

02. Grammarly for Safari

Grammarly

Grammarly can help you minimize writing errors and discover the ideal words to express yourself in a variety of ways, from grammar and spelling to style and tone. It contains a dictionary function, so you can obtain a definition or a link to something relevant to a word or phrase when you double-click it on a web page. Grammarly will provide you with real-time comments on Gmail, Google Docs, Twitter, LinkedIn, and practically everywhere else you write.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing:
They have three plans. 1. Free, 2. Premium, 3. Business

03. Evernote Web Clipper

Evernote.com

Evernote users will benefit from the Evernote web clipper plugin. Evernote is still the finest method to clip and save everything worth saving online, despite some limits. This is not to be confused with bookmarking in the browser. When you save something to Evernote, it remains there indefinitely. It has annotating capabilities built-in. When you save a screenshot, give it a name so you can find it later using Evernote.com or the offline tools and apps (at least two of them).

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing:
They have three plans. 1. Free, 2. Personal: $7.99/month, 3. Professional: $9.99/month

04. Honey for Safari

Honey

Honey detects the shopping site you’re on and displays a drop-down list of relevant discounts or links directly on the page to help you save money. It will also apply all available coupons to your checkout service on selected sites, saving you from having to cut/paste/type cryptic, lengthy codes.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing: free

05. Save to Pocket

Pocket

Pocket, formerly known as “Read It Later,” is a content curator that lets you save things to read later. Create an account and use the Save to Pocket extension, bookmark buttons, or applications to save information. Pocket helps you organize and save all of your fascinating blog posts, photos, and videos in one location, rather than keeping a laundry list of links in an Excel file elsewhere. It’s a fantastic tool for developing the habit of gathering stuff to preserve and share later.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing:
They have three pricing plans. 1. Free, 2. $44.99/year, 3. $4.99/month

06. Adblock Plus

Adblock Plus

Adblock Plus is a free browser plugin that lets you tailor your online browsing experience. When attempting to read a fascinating article online, no one enjoys invasive advertisements. You can stop tracking, prevent unwanted advertising, and do a lot more. Adblock Plus provides a reasonable approach to advertisements, with a setting that allows for “acceptable ads,” recognizing that website owners must still make money while protecting you from the annoyance of the worst kinds of ads. Adblock Plus is a GPLv3-licensed open source project.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing: free

07. Liner

Liner

Liner is a web-based highlight and annotation application that has been available for a few years. After you exit the annotation page, the highlights will appear in a single list. Multiple annotations or links can be grouped together in a single folder (the free version allows up to three folders). Searching the Liner app returns all of your highlights and link titles. Recent improvements have made it even better than before, and it’s now super simple to sync many devices. Liner’s live recommendations can help you research more quickly. Every time you highlight something, you get recommendations.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing:
They have three plans. 1. Basic: Free, 2. Premium: $7.99/month, 3. Pro: $14.99/month

08. LastPass

LastPass

LastPass is a password manager that is available for free. It works on multiple devices and provides a secure location to store files and notes. It can also import passwords from other programs. Even on the free version, there is no restriction on the number of passwords that may be stored and synchronized. The Safari extension allows you to establish safe passwords, rapidly fill out forms, and make notes all from the convenience of your browser.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing:
Single Users & Families: Premium: $3.00/month, Families: $4.00/month
Business Plans: Teams: $4.00/month, Business: $6.00/month

09. Instapaper Save

Instapaper

Instapaper allows you to store any web material in a clean, customizable format so that you may read it whenever you want and in the manner that suits you best. To add any web material to your Instapaper account, just log into the Instapaper software on your Mac and select the Instapaper browser icon.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing:
$2.99/month. $29.99/year.

10. Buffer

Buffer

You may schedule posts to Buffer with the Buffer Safari plugin. You will be able to generate and plan social media material faster utilizing this application, and you will be able to do so from anywhere on the internet. It connects directly with a variety of websites and makes it easier to exchange material. You may connect to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn, to mention a few platforms. A handy “Share picture” option will also display, allowing you to share the right photographs for social media more easily throughout the web.

👉 Download

🏷 Pricing:
They have two plans. 1. Free. 2. Essentials: $5/month

Are you excited to check out one or more of these Safari add-ons, or do you have any more you’d like to recommend? Please let us know in the comments section below.

*This post was originally posted on DigitalGpoint.

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Kei

Tutorial: How to Export Highlight and Notes into Roam Research

People Who Would Benefit

  • Want to export selected sentences from web articles into Roam Research at once.

  • Use Roam Research and want to cite sentences from web articles.

Why Glasp?

1. We don’t disturb your reading experience 💡

  • What you need is just highlighting sentences you like, which ends within two seconds.

  • You don’t need to copy & paste sentences one by one while reading.

2. Export sentences you want in markdown at once 🙌

  • You don’t need to export the whole article and edit it later. You can export only sentences you want.

  • Glasp enables you to copy & paste sentences in the markdown style, so you don’t need to edit it later on Roam Research.

3. You can find like-minded people 📚

  • We have more than 2,700+ people who are avid readers, critical thinkers, note-takers, and lifelong learners in our community! So, you can find people who you will learn from together.

Things Needed

How to Install Glasp’s Chrome Extension and Select Sentences You Want

1. Prepare a desktop and browser (Chrome, Brave, Edge, or Safari)

  • Glasp works only on Chrome, Brave, Edge, or Safari on the desktop. Firefox is coming soon!

  • Open the Glasp page from the link below.

👉 Glasp — Web Page

2. Sign up for Glasp

  • Click Sign Up (beta), create an account with Google, and choose your favorite topics(you can change them whenever you want).

  • If you’re asked to fill in the Typeform, please help us. It takes one to two minutes 🙏

3. Install the Browser extension

  • After you created an account and reached the Home page, please click the link below to install the Chrome extension.

👉 Glasp — Chrome Web Store

👉 Glasp — Safari Web Store

4. Open any article you like, select and highlight sentences you want to export

  • Once you installed the Chrome extension, click the icon on the toolbar to open Glasp’s sidebar.

  • Select any sentences you want in the article. You see a popup showing up, then select any color you want (a red arrow at left). You will see that the selected sentence is highlighted and added to the sidebar on the left.

  • After highlighting sentences, go to the Home page by clicking an icon at the top right on the sidebar (a red arrow at right).

  • If you couldn’t highlight the sentence, please refresh the page and try it again 🙏

How to Export Sentences into Roam Research

1. Go to your profile page by clicking “My Highlights” at the top left (a red circle at left)

  • Select an article you want to export, then click “Copy Content” at the top right (a red circle at right).

  • If you click another article, you can export that article’s highlighted sentences.

2. Paste sentences on Roam Research

  • Open a New note on Roam Research and paste highlighted sentences by Command+V for Mac or Ctrl+V for Windows.

  • Yay, you got everything copied and pasted from the web article 🎉

  • You can edit the sentence or style as you want 🙂

Before You Leave

Any questions?

  • Please look at FAQ or message us through Twitter.

👉 FAQs

👉 Twitter

Thank you for reading! Hope this article helps you understand how to export web article’s highlighted sentences into Roam Research with Glasp.

If you’re interested in my Glasp, please check it from here 😉

👉 Glasp

See you next time,

Kei

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Kei

How I Increased My Productivity of Writing Articles?

Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

There are many tools to help writers write articles effectively. Some of them assist them to find ideas to write on and some others are about editing articles visually well. And as I’ve been chatting and interviewing content writers, I’ve seen many writers' workflow and noticed that there’s one common thing they can improve. In this article, I’ll introduce how I improve my productivity in writing articles. Since this is still in my ongoing improvement process, it’ll have some adjustments later in the future, but I hope it helps you increase your productivity.

My Previous Writing Flow

Before I move on, let me briefly explain my previous writing flow. The writing step would be differed depending on the topics or how I write articles, but the core steps are common.

The first step was doing an organization of what I’ll write about. It’s about choosing a topic to write, imaging reader persona, and researching for resources I refer to. Mainly, I organize my idea on Notion and research resources on my Pocket depository and through Google. Once I find enough resources on the topic, I reorganize my thoughts on Notion. Then, I start writing a draft on Notion and once I have finished it, I copy and paste it on Medium to post.

There are some issues in this flow. The first problem is the storage and management of resources. I used to save articles in Pocket that I wanted to read or thought were relevant, but when I tried to find them when I needed them, it was difficult to find them. Pocket has a Tag function and an archive function, which I feel is not too confusing, but it is difficult to find the actual phrase from the article When I want to search by article content, I can’t find it in Pocket, which is frustrating.

The second problem is remembering the content of the article. I can remember some of the content of the articles I read, but I need to understand the details in order to actually write the article, so I end up having to read the article again. And I feel like it’s a waste of time because I forget what I thought the first time I read it at the time.

The third problem is when actually writing the article. When writing by referring to several articles, it is sometimes more efficient to copy the content of the article, organize it, add my own interpretation and context, and then write, but this process takes time. I wish I could easily and quickly refer back to the important parts of an article.

With these considerations in mind, I was able to develop a new writing flow.

My New Writing Flow

My new writing flow is the same basic flow, but I have modified the flow slightly and started using a new and different tool.

What to write and how to choose topics are the same in terms of discussion and research. Next, I started using Glasp as a place to store resources for articles, Glasp is a social web highlighter that allows people to highlight and collect web articles, organize them, and Find like-minded people to learn together. I usually highlight articles in Glasp when I read them, so when I need to find a resource for an article, I can just come back to Glasp. The good thing is that the article highlights are saved in addition to the article title and links, so I can quickly recall an overview of the article just by looking at a few highlights. Then, after grabbing an overview of a few articles and looking for other resources on Google, I organize them in Notion and start writing a simple article structure. After referencing a few articles, summarizing my thoughts, and writing a draft, I read it over several times, finalize it, and publish it on Medium.

The most time-consuming part of my previous writing flow was organizing and finding resources, so now that I have improved on that, I can devote more time to the act of writing itself, which has increased my efficiency and the quality of my articles.

Glasp has contributed to my efficiency in writing articles in the following ways

1. Simplified Resource Organization

As mentioned in the part above, what I find most valuable is how easy it is to visualize and organize resources for articles. Whenever I read a good article, I use Glasp to highlight what I think is good, what I agree with, and what I have questions about and leave a brief note. That way, when I review the article later, I can look back at the important parts, the parts I empathize with, and the quotes. CORTEX FUTURA, who studies and advises on PKM, also states in his article;

“For every highlight that you make, try to also note down a couple of words on why you are highlighting the sentence.”

Then, after reading the articles, you can collect and store articles on a certain topic by tagging the articles and categorizing them. I used to write articles on network effects and it was very useful because I could put many articles in one place.

2. Streamlining the Discovery of Article Resources

Second, it has streamlined the discovery of resources. In addition to tagging and listing articles, Glasp saves highlighted sentences so that you can search for articles by sentence or phrase. For example, if I put the quote above, “For every highlight that you make, try to also note down a couple of words on why you are highlighting the sentence.” in the search bar as it is, you will get a hit for this sentence.

This phrase search has improved my ability to find articles, as I often remember phrases but cannot recall the title of the article.

Glasp also allows you to search from other people’s pages since each user has his/her own profile page. The following user had read the same article as me in the past, so I searched for the same phrase as above and got a hit.

Also, if you type in Knowledge Management, for example, you will see his articles on knowledge management.

3. Simplified Import of Article Text

Finally, it is easy to import the content of the article you wish to refer to. In the past, you had to open an article, select a specific sentence, and copy and paste it, but with Glasp, you can do this with a single click. There are two ways to transfer the content of an article to Notion or other applications.

One is to import everything at once. As shown in the image below, clicking “Copy Content” on the profile will save all the highlighted sentences and your notes from the article to the clipboard. All can be imported in one batch.

The second method is to do it on a per highlighted sentence basis. As shown below, click on the highlighted sentence and a Glasp popup will appear. Click on the second icon from the right to copy the highlighted sentence and save it to the clipboard. It is very easy, just paste it into Notion.

Additional Benefit

The following are the benefits I see in using Glasp, other than the efficiency of organizing resources.

1. Building Audiences

Glasp is a social web highlighter that gives anyone access to a user’s profile. This means that anyone can share a link to your profile and know what you read and how you think. As a writer, readers may ask you what resources you refer to when writing articles, where you get your inspiration, what articles you read outside of work, and so on. Sharing your end product as an article or newsletter, as well as your process, will make them more interested in you and make it easier to build your audience.

Glasp also has a social component within the service: since there is a Home feed, articles you read and highlight can be distributed to the Home feed and be discovered by users within Glasp. From there it also happens easily to go to your profile and follow you. This is how you can build an initial audience through your content.

2. Feedback from Readers

The next advantage is that you can get insights from your readers, and since Glasp allows anyone to see what users have highlighted, you can actually see what they identify with, what they think is important, and what notes they leave behind by looking at your readers’ pages that highlight your articles. As anyone who has written an article on Medium will tell you, being able to see which parts of your article your readers actually identify with is a huge advantage. In fact, one of the problems I have after writing an article is that it is difficult to know what readers thought of my article. Many readers do nothing after reading the article, and the only information they receive is that the number of views will increase by one. Knowing what readers thought of your article and what part of it they empathized with is a huge advantage when writing an article.

(This is an article “And You Will Know Us by the Company We Keep” by Eugene Wei. And the note is by Ben Mathes)

3. Understanding Readers’ Persona

The last good point is that we know the personas of our readers. As mentioned above, each Glasp user has a profile page. So you can see what other articles your readers are reading and what they are interested in. Also, many users have Linkedin, Twitter, and Medium links, so you can see who they really are. I have found in interviews with writers, as I do, that the most important thing a writer takes into account when writing an article is the image of the reader who will actually read the article. By using Glasp, writers can get a better grasp of their reader personas and write articles for the people they want to reach.

Other motivators for learning are the visualization of one’s learning history. And since your learning history is publicly available, you can prove that you are the type of person who can continue to put in the steady effort. Although it is not currently a feature of the system, we may add an indicator to show proficiency in a certain area, and this data could be used for Job Hunting. You can definitely use it as a Social profile as it is a profile of your interests and learning.

I hope this article helps you increase your writing productivity. If you have any questions, let me know on Twitter or in the comments.

See you next time,

Kei

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Kei

Tutorial: How to Export Web Article’s Highlighted Sentences into Obsidian

People Who Would Benefit

  • Want to export selected sentences from web articles into Obsidian at once.

  • Use Obsidian and want to cite sentences from web articles.

Why Glasp?

1. We don’t disturb your reading experience 💡

  • What you need is just highlighting sentences you like, which ends within two seconds.

  • You don’t need to copy & paste sentences one by one while reading.

2. Export sentences you want in markdown at once 🙌

  • You don’t need to export the whole article and edit it later. You can export only sentences you want.

  • Glasp enables you to copy & paste sentences in the markdown style, so you don’t need to edit it later on Obsidian.

3. You can find like-minded people 📚

  • We have more than 2,700+ people who are avid readers, critical thinkers, note-takers, and lifelong learners in our community! So, you can find people who you will learn from together.

Things Needed

How to Install Glasp’s Browser Extension and Select Sentences You Want

1. Prepare a desktop and browser (Chrome, Brave, Edge, or Safari)

  • Glasp works only on Chrome, Brave, Edge, or Safari on the desktop.

  • Open the Glasp page from the link below.

👉 Glasp — Web Page

2. Sign up for Glasp

  • Click Sign Up (beta), create an account with Google, and choose your favorite topics(you can change them whenever you want).

  • If you’re asked to fill in the Typeform, please help us. It takes one to two minutes 🙏

3. Install the browser extension

  • After you created an account and reached the Home page, please click the link below to install the Chrome/Safari extension.

👉 Glasp — Chrome Web Store

👉 Glasp — Safari Web Store

4. Open any article you like, select and highlight sentences you want to export

  • Once you installed the Chrome/Safari extension, click the icon on the toolbar to open Glasp’s sidebar.

  • Select any sentences you want in the article. You see a popup showing up, then select any color you want (a red arrow at left). You will see that the selected sentence is highlighted and added to the sidebar on the left.

  • After highlighting sentences, go to the Home page by clicking an icon at the top right on the sidebar (a red arrow at right).

  • If you couldn’t highlight the sentence, please refresh the page and try it again 🙏

How to Export Sentences into Obsidian

1. Go to your profile page by clicking “My Highlights” at the top left (a red circle at left)

  • Select an article you want to export, then click “Copy Content” at the top right (a red circle at right).

  • If you click another article, you can export that article’s highlighted sentences.

2. Paste sentences on Obsidian

  • Open a New note on Obsidian and paste highlighted sentences by Command+V for Mac or Ctrl+V for Windows.

  • Yay, you got everything copied and pasted from the web article 🎉

  • You can edit the sentence or style as you want 🙂

Before You Leave

Any questions?

  • Please look at FAQ or message us through Twitter.

👉 FAQs

👉 Twitter

Thank you for reading! Hope this article helps you understand how to export web article’s highlighted sentences into Obsidian with Glasp.

If you’re interested in my Glasp, please check it from here 😉

👉 Glasp

See you next time,

Kei

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Kei

Tutorial: How to Export Web Article’s Sentences into Notion

People Who Would Benefit

  • Want to export selected sentences from web articles into Notion to take note.

  • Use Notion and want to cite sentences from web articles.

Why Glasp?

1. We don’t disturb your reading experience 💡

  • What you need is just highlighting sentences you like, which ends within two seconds.

  • You don’t need to copy & paste sentences one by one while reading.

2. Export sentences you want at once 🙌

  • You don’t need to export the whole article and edit it later. You can export only sentences you want.

  • Glasp enables you to copy & paste sentences in the markdown style, so you don’t need to edit it later on Notion.

3. You can find like-minded people 📚

  • We have more than 2,700+ people who are avid readers, critical thinkers, note-takers, and lifelong learners! So, you can find people who you will learn from together.

Things Needed

How to Install Glasp’s Browser Extension and Select Sentences You Want

1. Prepare a desktop and browser (Chrome, Brave, Edge, or Safari)

  • Glasp works only on Chrome, Brave, Edge, or Safari on the desktop. Firefox is upcoming soon!

  • Open the Glasp page from the link below.

👉 Glasp — Web Page

2. Sign up for Glasp

  • Click Sign Up (beta), create an account with Google, and choose your favorite topics(you can change them whenever you want).

  • If you’re asked to fill in the Typeform, please help us. It takes one to two minutes 🙏

3. Install the browser extension

  • After you created an account and reached the Home page, please click the link below to install the Chrome/Safari extension.

👉 Glasp — Chrome Web Store

👉 Glasp — Safari Web Store

4. Open an article you like, select and highlight sentences you want to export

  • Once you installed the Chrome/Safari extension, click the icon on the toolbar to open Glasp’s sidebar.

  • Select any sentences you want in the article. You see a popup showing up, then select any color you want (a red arrow at left). You will see that the selected sentence is highlighted and added to the sidebar on the left.

  • After highlighting sentences, go to the Home page by clicking an icon at the top right on the sidebar (a red arrow at right).

  • If you couldn’t highlight the sentence, please refresh the page and try it again 🙏

How to Export Sentences into Notion

1. Go to your profile page by clicking “My Highlights” at the top left (a red circle at left)

  • Select an article you want to export, then click “Copy Content” at the top right (a red circle at right).

  • If you click another article, you can export that article’s highlighted sentences.

2. Paste sentences on Notion

  • Open a new page on Notion and paste highlighted sentences by Command+V for Mac and Ctrl+V for Windows.

  • Yay, you got everything copied and pasted from the web article 🎉

  • You can edit the sentence or style as you want 🙂

Before you leave

Any Questions?

  • Please look at FAQ or message us through Twitter.

👉 FAQs

👉 Twitter

Thank you for reading! Hope this article helps you understand how to export web article’s highlighted sentences into Notion with Glasp 😉

👉 Glasp

See you next time,

Kei

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Kei

Why We Should Learn in Public

Introduction

Recently, I read SHAWN’s blog about “Learn in Public.” It explains why, what, and how is Learn in public, and I resonated with his idea because I’ve been thinking about the same concept for a while.

Learn in Public is a great concept. He describes it as “A habit of creating learning exhaust.” And for example, you can do it by;

  • Write blogs and tutorials, speak at meetups, ask and answer questions on Reddit or Twitter, create YouTube videos, write a newsletter, and so on.

Naturally, people share what they learn with friends or colleagues on verbal or social media, but I don’t think the concept of “Learn in Public” is not well known by those who are in NOT tech field. I searched “#LearnInPublic” on Twitter, I saw many people tweeting with that tag, but most of them were about coding and engineering.

I think this is because an advocator of “Learn in Public” is an engineer and I see many tech people in his followers. And, “Learn in Public”, I’d think, is an analogy of “Build in Public”, which is used in the development, especially for GitHub. So I’m not wondering to know that the term is used by developers mainly.

But for people who don’t know Learn in Public, it’s an opportunity lost. So, I’ve decided to write this article to tell why non-tech people should also learn in public.

Why Learn in Public?

In one word, I think the Learn in Public is an investment in your & human society’s future. You will benefit by doing it.

Investment in Your Future

Make a Serendipity Vehicle

Nowadays, the average people can publish and distribute their idea at a reasonable cost. So, you can publish what you learn through Learn in Public and other people can access your learning and thoughts.

David Perell recommends people to write content online and says in The Ultimate Guide to Writing Online;

“When you publish ideas, you create your own “Serendipity Vehicle” — a magnet for ideas and people and opportunities from potentially every corner of the globe. If your ideas resonate with people, people will discover you and bring you unexpected opportunities. They’ll open doors you never knew existed.”

You can create the “Serendipity Vehicle” through Learn in Public. It works to connect you with like-minded people and attract intelligent audiences. As he says, you will get unexpected opportunities.

Receive More Feedback

When you start learning something, it’s better to have feedback from expertise or someone who passes more. Because it will determine what you need to learn more and which one you should focus on. If you share the process of learning online, you will receive much more feedback than sharing in print. That will accelerate your learning.

Build Your Online Profile

In an era where people can share their ideas and learn easily online, having your online profile is important. Because people who don’t know you can look into your profile, and they can see what kind of person you are and what you have learned so far. Your online profile is your online resume.

Also, the advantage of an online profile is that it’ll be your lifelong asset because you can look back at it anytime and you can share it unlimitedly. Even though you don’t actively work, the online profile spreads you to new people.

Investment in Human Society’s Future

Teach Effectively

Remember in your school days. When you ask a question and a teacher answers to you in a class, it means that he is teaching everyone in the class. We can see the same thing on social media such as Twitter, Reddit, and Quora. They can teach both you and other people effectively. And you’re helping a community by sharing the questions and answers even though you don’t notice it.

Future Ages Learn from You

Not only for teachers or answerers but also for learners, they can learn effectively. Because if you share the questions and answers, other people can learn from them. The development of study in a topic is dependent on the amount of content to some extend. The more content being created, the more learners come in and the easier it is to learn.

And your online profile will be a lighthouse for beginners. If they want to start learning what you have already learned, they can look into your profile and find how to master it. As I said, your online profile is your lifelong asset, so you can contribute to human society in your entire life.

Standing on the Shoulder of Giants

I believe that people have been getting smarter and smarter over generations. The development of human society progresses slowly, so you might not be able to see it, but if you compare a day in 2022, it’s by far better than a day in 1522. This is because people have been passing knowledge and wisdom over generations. As of 1522, it was written on paper and only a few people could access it, but anyone can access it now.

I like the saying “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants” by Isaac Newton. It explains why people in this era can relish prosperity. We are standing in the place where predecessors have built over centuries. So, as they have done, we are responsible for taking over and passing it to the next generation. I think that I’m glad if I can contribute and pile my knowledge on the historia of wisdom even though it’s a tiny piece of it.

Improvements on Current Learn in Public

I found two main improvements on Learn in Public, especially for non-tech learners, to prevail this concept.

1. Difficulty of Creating Content Constantly

The difficulty of creating content results in failure to make a new habit. If you can’t continue doing what you started, you will drop in the loop of continuing to start something. And you will get nothing.

If you want to make a new habit, an action should be very easy to keep on. And you need an excuse for not doing it on some days. The easiness of action is the key to the new habit. You cannot make a new habit that is a big burden for you and is far away from what you’re doing right now. A friend of mine has been keeping pushing up every day for a couple of years. The trick is that his rule of push-up is to do it one time a day. It’s not one set, it’s just one push-up. He can do it even in bed and some people ridicule him, but he’s been doing it for some years. And once the push-up one time a day roots in his habit, he has been increasing the number of times. As you see, you need to make a new habit easy to keep on.

Even if a new habit is easy, however, when you are comfortable doing it, then you’ll see your progress. Curated learning of yours will motivate you to learn further and push you to explore related fields. If you enjoy the process, congrats. You are now in the loop of learning, so you can continue learning throughout your life.

The issue is that creating content constantly probably isn’t your habit right now. You need a cushion before starting doing it. I think one of the solutions could be sharing the process of your learning passively. And in that system, it should be designed to decrease the burden and to last for a long time.

One bad thing about failing to create a new habit is that when people cannot create content from what they learned, the rule of 1:9:90 won’t change forever. It says that in a social media network, 1% of people create content, 9% of people update or change content, and the rest 90% of them just consume content. It’d be mathematically correct, but for a community and human society, it’s better if more people can contribute to creating content. Because I believe everyone in the world has unique experiences and learning and it’s valuable for someone in the world. Unless it appears, it’ll be just lost and it’s also a loss for human society.

2. Difficulty of Making an Online Profile

Another improvement is that it’d be hard to create an online profile. If you post content or questions on multiple platforms such as Twitter, Reddit, and Substack, you will notice that you want an aggregated place where all of your learning histories are collected. If you have a place to look back at what you’ve learned in private, it’s Learn in Private.

In the era where attention is a most scarce resource, having your profile and home page online where all process of your learning is shown is a big advantage. Because if your learning process is public, someone who has the same interest as you or has the same issue as you will visit your page. It works like a magnet that connects people who have the same interest as you. Then, you can find your supporters, like-minded people, and advisors.

And the advantage of sharing the whole process of learning in one place is that after ages can learn from yourself effectively. If the process is either not shared or displayed here and there, they will lose the context. But if it’s shown clearly, they will learn from you and appreciate you.

Our Solution

I haven’t mentioned it yet, but we’re building a place called Glasp. Apologize if it sounds like a promotion. But it is a web application that you can collect and highlight web articles, organize them, and follow like-minded people to learn together.

We have started it based on the mission “to democratize access to other people’s learning and experiences that they have collected throughout their lives as a utilitarian legacy.” It’s at the beginning of our journey, but we believe that we can achieve the mission and contribute to human society.

We have a social DNA at the core. Everything you highlight is public and accessible to anyone on Glasp. You can learn from predecessors. And by using it, you will have an online profile that collects what you have learned and projects your identity, and be connected with people who have the same interest as you.

We make it not to disturb your reading experience and design it so that reading & learning will be your new habit. What you need to do is just select a sentence you think is important or resonates with and click a popup. You can finish doing it within two seconds.

If you already have your own way for Learn in Public, that’s great and we don’t want to push a new method to you. But if you don’t have it, you can check out and try Glasp.

👉 Glasp Social Web Highlighter

We hope we can open the next door for you and you can find like-minded people to learn together. Here’s my Glasp profile if you are interested.

See you next time

Best,

Kei

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